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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and, of course, their own country, lawyers have experience a lot of pain in the civil rights movement. so my question is, in line with the comment about practical steps, what would be a facing of the introduction of the rule of law that might be suggested to the chinese government and to chinese political and legal leaders as a way to avoid these calamitous events and bring about the rule of law? >> can you suggest to them that they pay the judges and say we will reducers our, we won't fire you? they might be willing to do that. and after they did that, you know, judges would love it, and nobody else would like it. but i mean, they would do, or maybe they would say we have an administrative law grow here. by the way, let's have all the corporate cities on television. the proceeding, i'm not saying the deliberations. why don't he they do that? let's not get into that. 5 let's have the trials and all those things. they do that. maybe they would, or maybe, what about this arbitration resolving business differences, would you be willing to take some the judges? after all, you're not payin
. if you look at the civil rights movement, that started with emmitt till, montgomery, montgomery was supposed to be a boycott. people on the ground who begin to drive this issue. the conversation can't start in washington. washington is an aftereffect. it has to start with the people in various places driving them to move. if that doesn't happen, they will not move. >> you're absolutely right. that is the history of movements in america. but there is going to be a bill we know senator dianne feinstein is going to introduce a bill on the first day of the new congress. why shouldn't more folks get behind that, including some republicans? because i'd like to remind you of one thing. justice scalia said in the heller decision, like most rights the second amendment is not unlighted. he said, it is not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever for whatever purpose. from the high priest of the supreme court of conservatism himself. why doesn't that create some room for current conservatives like ronald reagan did in 1994 to back an assault weapons ban? >>
and christine gregoire from washington, why in. >> two governors leading an important new civil right struggle, the civil rights struggle of our generation, many feel as i do, and they helped spearhead the effort to gain marriage equality in their state, in washington state and maryland this year. they did it against the odds and knowing that there would be a referendum, a voter referendum if they pushed the legislatures into this and knowing also that marriage equality had never been approved in a voter referendum. they led that fight against the odds and as a result the citizens of their state are better off and have more fairness and more equality in their states this year. >> anna, you also chose a governor from your party as well, chris christie. >> dana, you know he was on the nice list when my democrat colleague and friend richard chose him on the nice list, too, so when richard and i are agreeing it tells you the man was nice. >> although i think chris christie could have been on my naughty list, too, ana. >> and i think he'd be happy with that, too. what chris christie did this year d
're really going to do it. and sometimes it sort of takes in social movements, whether civil rights, anything historically it takes a certain amount of push at the beep ginning to get the momentum started and many years of struggling and then some other big event at the end to sort of push us over the top. and i think we may have seen that. i'm especially hopeful that gun owners and gun supporters who want to have guns can get together and say -- and the polls show this is true and say yes we want to have our guns but we also want to do sensible things too. we don't want to see our children dying. let's quit fighting about whether to have this and sit down at the table and come up with thing that is any sensible person can agree to and let's do those things. host: one more call. this one from mark in florida on our line for republicans. caller: i would just like to thank you for your rational discussion on the subject. i agree, and i pray that we've reached a tipping point like last friday i cried like you and i don't pretend to be an expert on any of this i'm just a concerned citizen. and i
sectarian civil war. we're talking a time frame of years. right now, jon, the death toll is about 45,000. a lot of people are saying that number could easily double in the coming months and years as this violence continues, jon. jon: the refugees keep streaming out of that war-torn country. leland vittert in jerusalem for us. leland, thank you. harris: new information from russia today where president vladmir putin has signed that bill banning americans from adopting russian children. we saw this coming and now it has happened. the bill angering americans and russians who say it victimizes the children just to make a political point. amy kellogg is live for us in london with more. amy, why have they passed this law? >> reporter: well, harris, the law is named after dima yakovlev, a toddler who died in the custody of his adoptive american parents a few years ago in the washington, d.c. area. he was left in a car in the heat but basically, it does appear that this law was actually a reaction to a law passed in the united states. it puts travel bans, visa bans and asset freezes on 60 ru
in the nearly two-year long civil war that activists say killed more than 40,000 people but it has not stopped the syrian government from attacking its own men, women, and children. a human rights group reports the regime shelled a bakery and killed 20 people, including at least eight children. we cannot independently confirm that. we're joined by a journalist who specializes on middle east affairs. this is a significant defection, lisa, and it appears from the you don't see that you have bashar al-assad losing his grip on power. >> absolutely. this is one of the most significant diminishing of power for the bashar al-assad regime. we've seen the military be a full supporter of asaid. a few defections but nothing of that caliber that would keep him there. there's a few factors that since march of 2011 when uprisings began in syria that helped assad stayed in power. little by little we see these factors dissolve, one the military and this large defection we had today. the other being support from russia. the two other elements that still remain in place, however, keeping him there, are thal awa
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)